Monthly Archives: July 2014

Israel kills Palestinian football legend

Ahed-Zaqout.Palestine49-year-old Ahed Zaqout was not known to belong to any particular political entity and had never expressed clear political views. Nidal Al-Mughrabi of Reuters reports.

(July 31) – Ahed Zaqout, a former Palestinian national team player, has been killed by an Israeli bomb that hit his apartment in Gaza, Palestinian medical officials said on Thursday.

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BBC: 200th anniversary of Lord’s – ‘Home of Cricket’

From WG Grace to Graham Gooch’s 333

Michael Atherton, Scahin Tendulkar and Shane Warne

Sachin Tendulkar and Shane Warne – watched by former England captain Michael Atherton – led rival teams in an anniversary match at Lord’s

(July 17) – Lord’s – the feted ‘Home of Cricket’ – is celebrating its 200th birthday as it hosts the second Test between England and India.

The north-west London venue, founded by cricketer-turned-wine merchant Thomas Lord, is home to the Long Room, the egg-and-bacon colours of Marylebone Cricket Club, the Grace Gates and honours boards on which every cricketer dreams of seeing their name. Continue reading

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NCAA settles concussion lawsuit with $70m fund for college athletes

US university sporting cartel forced to agree to standardise how colleges treat players with head injuries and allow for athletes to seek compensation. Instead of adopting stricter protections for athletes, the lawsuit said the NCAA chose “to sacrifice them on an altar of money and profits”, an approach that occurred even though the NCAA had known for at least a decade “of the correlation between concussions and depression, dementia and early onset Alzheimer’s disease.” A 2010 internal NCAA survey found almost half of athletes with signs of a concussion were put back into the same game. 

American college sports, especially football, has come under scrutiny for head injuries sustained during play | Kathy Willens/AP

American college sports, especially football, has come under scrutiny for head injuries sustained during play | Kathy Willens/AP

AP (July 29 ) – The NCAA agreed Tuesday to settle a class-action head-injury lawsuit by creating a $70m fund to diagnose thousands of current and former college athletes to determine if they suffered brain trauma playing football, hockey, soccer and other contact sports. Continue reading

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World Cup 2018: There is truly no limit to the British hypocrisy!

Foot on ballAccording to Nick Clegg, Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and a vicious supporter of the regime change wars in Libya and Syria, which claimed the lives of hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians, it is “unthinkable” that Russia should host the World Cup in 2018 because pro-Russian separatist rebels have been accused by the US-NATO military bloc of shooting down the Malaysia Airlines airplane.

Yet, it was quite acceptable for the United Kingdom, which is responsible for (not accused of) the killing of over 1000 000 Afghans, Iraqis, Libyans, and destroying THREE countries, to have hosted the Olympic Games in 2012!! Continue reading

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Moroccan sports fans chant for Gaza

Watch video

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Detroit, other US cities ripping off public workers to fund stadiums

Taxpayers face major cuts to their negotiated benefits yet remain on the hook for a $283 million gaudy new arena in the bankrupt city DAVID SIROTA

Detroit's latest pension disgrace: A gaudy new arena at retirees' expense

Joe Louis Arena in Detroit | AP/Paul Sancya

Salon (July 24) – As states and cities grapple with budget shortfalls, many are betting big on an unproven formula: Slash public employee pension benefits and public services while diverting the savings into lucrative subsidies for professional sports teams.

Detroit this week became the most prominent example of this trend. Officials in the financially devastated city announced that their plan to slash public workers’ pension benefits will move forward. On the same day, the billionaire owners of the Detroit Red Wings, the Ilitch family, unveiled details of an already approved taxpayer-financed stadium for the professional hockey team.

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US sanctions Red Bull for staging cliff diving event in Cuba

 Red Bull pays $90,000 for OFAC Cuba travel sanction violations Continue reading

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Who needs sports drinks anyway?

For those who aren’t professional runners, sports drinks and energy bars don’t provide nutritional value. JILL RICHARDSON*

(July 22) – Americans spent $5.5 billion on sports drinks, mostly Gatorade and Powerade last year. Even 12 per cent of elementary school kids drink sports drinks. And that doesn’t even count expenditures on other sports nutrition products, like an estimated $583 million spent on nutrition bars in 2013, or the more than 25 million packets of GU energy gel produced each year.

Endurance athletes have unique nutritional needs, which means at least some of the sports nutrition products on the market serve a crucial purpose. But how many of us guzzle Gatorade while training for a marathon, and how many of us drink it while sitting on the couch?

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‘It’s also a job’: Former minor leaguers suing MLB over paltry wages, often below poverty level

In this June 3, 2007, file photo, US college player Aaron Senne of Missouri rounds second base after hitting a solo home run in an NCAA Regional baseball game. Senne and former minor-league players in each of the 30 Major League Baseball monopolies including Toronto Blue Jays are suing the MLB cartel, alleging violations of federal wage and overtime laws in a case some legal observers suggest has significant merit. | AP Photo/L.G. Patterson

In this June 3, 2007, file photo, US college player Aaron Senne of Missouri rounds second base after hitting a solo home run in an NCAA Regional baseball game. Senne and former minor-league players in each of the 30 Major League Baseball monopolies including Toronto Blue Jays are suing the MLB cartel, alleging violations of federal wage and overtime laws in a case some legal observers suggest has significant merit. | AP Photo/L.G. Patterson

Alan Scher Zagier, Associated Press | July 10| ST. LOUIS — Like many young baseball players, Aaron Senne dreamed of fame and fortune when he signed his first contract as a Miami Marlins’ draft choice after a record-breaking college career at Missouri.

Reality as a low-level minor leaguer was far different: vending machine dinners, bug-infested apartments and a paltry salary with an equivalent hourly wage less than what fast-food workers make.

Senne and former minor league players in each of the 30 big league organizations are suing Major League Baseball, alleging violations of federal wage and overtime laws in a case some legal observers suggest has significant merit. They are seeking class-action status on behalf of the estimated 6,000 ballplayers who toil each summer in outposts stretching from Bluefield, Virginia, to Bakersfield, California, as well as an unspecified amount of back pay. Continue reading

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US sporting events turned into mass religious events to bless wars and militarism

The religious reverie – repeated in sports arenas – is used to justify a bloated war budget and endless wars. CHRIS HEDGES

Memorial Day festivities before the Red Sox game against the Chicago White Sox at Fenway Park on May 30, 2011 in Boston, Massachusetts |  Joyce Vincent / Shutterstock.com

Memorial Day festivities before the Red Sox game against the Chicago White Sox at Fenway Park on May 30, 2011 in Boston, Massachusetts | Joyce Vincent / Shutterstock.com

BOSTON (July 8) — On Saturday I went to one of the massive temples across the country where we celebrate our state religion. The temple I visited was Boston’s Fenway Park. I was inspired to go by reading Andrew Bacevich’s thoughtful book “Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country,” which opens with a scene at Fenway from July 4, 2011. The Fourth of July worship service that I attended last week – a game between the Red Sox and the Baltimore Orioles – was a day late because of a rescheduling caused by Tropical Storm Arthur. When the crowd sang “The Star-Spangled Banner” a gargantuan American flag descended to cover “the Green Monster,” the 37-foot, 2-inch-high wall in left field. Patriotic music blasted from loudspeakers. Col. Lester A. Weilacher, commander of the 66th Air Base Group at Massachusetts’ Hanscom Air Force Base, wearing a light blue short-sleeved Air Force shirt and dark blue pants, threw the ceremonial first pitch. A line of Air Force personnel stood along the left field wall. The fighter jets—our angels of death—that usually roar over the stadium on the Fourth were absent. But the face of Fernard Frechette, a 93-year-old World War II veteran who was attending, appeared on the 38-by-100-foot Jumbotron above the center-field seats as part of Fenway’s “Hats Off to Heroes” program, which honors military veterans or active-duty members at every game. The crowd stood and applauded. Army National Guard Sgt. Ben Arnold had been honored at the previous game, on Wednesday. Arnold said his favorite Red Sox player was Mike Napoli. Arnold, who fought in Afghanistan, makes about $27,000 a year. Napoli makes $16 million. The owners of the Red Sox clear about $60 million annually. God bless America. Continue reading

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