Monthly Archives: November 2015

Concussions in the NHL: By the numbers

Concussions graph 1

Jesse Tahirali, CTVNews.ca

(Nov. 30) – Hockey thrives off of crushing body checks and game-stopping fist fights, but it’s the long-term consequences of on-ice violence the NHL seems less than eager to advertise.

In fact, at the request of the league, a court has sealed the majority of 2.5 million pages of internal documents related to a lawsuit brought forth by more than 100 former NHL players. Continue reading

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How one Palestinian is racing to get to the Olympics

Palestinian yoga and fitness instructor Mohamed al-Khatib trains for track and field events in the hopes of attending the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, Nov. 18, 2015 | Ash Gallagher

BY ASH GALLAGHER

RAMALLAH, West Bank (Nov 24) — Munching on dates for energy, 25-year-old Mohamed al-Khatib starts his morning at sunrise, hoping for an opportunity to use a track field at a local high school in Ramallah.

Khatib is a yoga and fitness instructor who is training for a chance to attend the 2016 Olympic Games in Brazil and race in the 100-meter and 200-meter track and field events. Continue reading

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Cuba: Sport will remain a right of the people

Flag ceremony of the Cuban delegation at Veracruz. Photo: Ismael Francisco / Cubadebate.

Antonio Becali | Ismael Francisco / Cubadebate.

(November 19) – Antonio Becali, president of the  National Institute of Sports, Physical Education and Recreation (INDER), said today that the agency will have ensure to its maximum that sport is a right of the people. Continue reading

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IAAF: Who is the ‘real’ Sebastian Coe?

Comment: The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), headed by its newly-elected president Sebastian Coe, has suspended Russia’s track and field federation by a 22-1 vote. The vote came within one week of a controversial report issued by the World Anti-Doping Association (WADA) citing Russia – and no other country – for doping violations under the pretext of high ideals. The meeting in London was hastily convened by Coe, himself a vice-president of the IAAF since 2007. ANDREAS SELLIAAS* analyses Coe’s compromised background and comments on his mounting challenges. Originally posted on this blog on August 20, 2015

Will newly elected athletics president Seb Coe (photo) get the IAAF back on its feet? | Andy Miah/Flickr

Will newly elected athletics president Seb Coe (photo) get the IAAF back on its feet? | Andy Miah/Flickr

(August 20) — Lord Sebastian Coe was Wednesday elected as new president of theInternational Association of Athletics Federations ahead of Sergey Bubka. Winning 115-92 was a comfortable, but not overwhelming victory. But for the former middle distance ace and successful leader of the 2012 London Olympics this was a great day. Continue reading

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Russia? 224 cases of British athletes missing drugs tests in last five years

Russia? As controversy over the report by the World Anti-Dopng Authority (WADA) incriminating Russia and its athletes escalates, shocking statistics from the UK Anti-Doping show a spike in missed tests the year before 2012 Olympics by British athletes. 

(18 Jun 2015) – Following the revelation that Mo Farah missed two drugs tests in 2010 and 2011, new data released by UK anti-doping shows the high number of British sportsmen and women missing tests. Continue reading

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The first disabled athlete on an able-bodied professional team

Serbian basketball player Natasa Kovacevic, who survived a bus crash with her team UNI Gyor of Hungary in 2013 and lost her left leg in the incident, is applauded during her first appearance on a basketball court at the All Star gala of the Women's Basketball European Championship in Budapest, Hungary, 27 June 2015. Natasa Kovacevic is the honour guest of the gala | EPA/Illyes Tibor HUNGARY OUT Click to enlarge

Serbian basketball player Natasa Kovacevic, who survived a bus crash with her team UNI Gyor of Hungary in 2013 and lost her left leg in the incident, is applauded during her first appearance on a basketball court at the All Star gala of the Women’s Basketball European Championship in Budapest, Hungary, 27 June 2015. Natasa Kovacevic is the honour guest of the gala | EPA/Illyes Tibor HUNGARY OUT
Click to enlarge

November 11 was a great day for Natasa Kovacevic, perhaps a good day for modern medicine, and certainly an inspiring day for anyone who faces a personal tragedy in an accident. A disabled woman, through hard work and the help of her doctors, is now playing professional basketball in an able-bodied team. She is a pioneer.

Everyone expects their lives to fundamentally change following an accident that leads to an amputation. In 2013, a bus accident killed her coach and the general manager of Gyor, the Hungarian team for which she played. She was fortunate to survive, albeit with an amputation of her lower foot, which is a big deal for a professional basketball player.

Two years later the 21 years old, 1,88-metre tall woman benefited from prosthetic surgery and was able to return to the basketball court, as a professional player for the legendary Red Star team. It is perhaps not that important, but she scored five points and her team did win.

Source: NEOnline | IR

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Systematic militarization by US sports monopolies and Pentagon

“Paid Patriotism”: a US report reveals massive pro-war and security propaganda campaign, which parallels that underway in Canada. Two pro-war politicians who are opposed, not to pro-war propaganda displays, but only to the fact that sports monopolies received payment for allowing the US state to put on its show. ERIC LONDON

Thunderbirds perform the MLB All-Star Game flyover

(November 6 ) – Anyone who has attended a professional sporting event in the United States over the last fifteen years is accustomed to the uncomfortable ritual of militarism that precedes each first pitch, kickoff or puck drop. Continue reading

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