Tag Archives: Amateur Sport

The Irish Rover: Building Moscow’s Gaelic football team

Members of the Moscow Shamrocks Gaelic football team.

By KRISTINA MOSKVINA

For the last four years, the Moscow Shamrocks has brought a flavour of Ireland’s national sport to the people of the Russian capital.

Not to be confused with “English football” or “soccer,” Gaelic football uses 15 players per team in matches lasting 70 minutes. Players can bounce, kick or pass the ball to move it down the field, but can only travel for four steps while carrying the ball. Continue reading

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Is winning everything?

By MICHAEL D. YATES*

When I was a boy, I loved sports. Baseball was my passion, and I could be found in the backyard, even in the middle of winter, endlessly throwing a rubber-coated baseball into the air and hitting it as far as I could with my bat. I played organized ball from the age of nine to twenty-two, in Little League, Pony League, American Legion, High School, College, and in town leagues. When I began teaching, basketball became my new sports obsession, and I played seven days a week for many years. Continue reading

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Pond life

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Curious hockey fact & photo

Students reenact the 1886 hockey game between Queen’s and RMC in Kingston, Ont., in 1980 | Queen’s University Archives

The above photo comes from this Nick Faris story on the oldest hockey rivalry in the world: Queen’s University vs. Royal Military College, dating back to a wintry afternoon on Kingston, Ont.’s frozen harbour in 1886. The animosity has endured for 132 years, through arena fires, Stanley Cup challenge games, off-ice mischief and a whole lot of losing seasons on the part of RMC of the Department of National Defence, which trains officer cadre for the Canadian Forces. The svelte, century-old uniform seems to be an improvement on today’s expensive, padded armour! It raises the question: when did the private NHL owners introduce “goon hockey” and to what end?

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Fidel and baseball

Fidel inaugurated revolutionary Cuba’s First National Series | Granma archive

(December 7) – It was hard times, in January of 1962. The Revolution was struggling against internal and external enemies who threatened its very existence. The Cuban people defeated one attempt after another to return the country to the past, under the undisputed leadership of Fidel Castro Ruz.

Amidst so many responsibilities as head of the nation, Fidel always found a few moments to devote to sports, which had already begun a transformation the previous year, to become an activity enjoyed by the people on a massive scale. Continue reading

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Report: MLB cartel aims to screw over international amateur free agents

Photo credit: John Minchillo/AP Images

Photo credit: John Minchillo/AP Images

According to ESPN’s Buster Olney, MLB wants to make life even harder on international amateur free agents by implementing an international draft in the new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA).

By TOM LEY, deadspin.com Continue reading

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Sochi 2014: The NHL’s blatant provocation against the Olympics

This article, first published on February 21, 2014 during the Sochi Winter Olympics, exposes both the aim and the method of how the NHL, hand in hand with the sports media, began creating the conditions to justify launching its own private “World Cup of Hockey.”

The discourse runs like this: we poor owners have been victimized and our fans short-changed and held hostage by the Olympics, because “the best league in the world has been shut down” (Prime Time Sports, Rogers Sportsnet, February 18, 2014). “Just look at our empty buildings.” It is reminiscent of the old saw about the thief crying “stop thief!” | TONY SEED*

The NHL can only drool over the figures. The Canada-U.S. men's hockey semifinal drew a television audience of more than 15 million for CBC on Friday. Photo: Corey Perry of Canada tries a wraparound on Jonathan Quick of the USA as he is defended by Cam Fowler during first period action in the men's hockey semifinal at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games, February 21, 2014 | Jean Levac/Postmedia News

The NHL can only drool over the figures. The Canada-U.S. men’s hockey semifinal drew a television audience of more than 15 million for CBC. (Photo) Corey Perry of Canada tries a wraparound on Jonathan Quick of the USA as he is defended by Cam Fowler during first period action in the men’s hockey semifinal at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games, February 21, 2014 | Jean Levac/Postmedia News

SEEMINGLY out of the blue, the National Hockey League (NHL) based in New York sent their fabled Stanley Cup trophy to Sochi. The media slavered when it made its appearance at Canada House on Monday, February 17th. The iconic silver trophy had seemingly fallen from the sky or appeared as if a gift from the gods of sport with a spiritual significance comparable to a burning bush.

In the media euphoria, Canadian Olympic members were organized to pose with the trophy and world champion figure skater Patrick Chan to bless it with a kiss.

Four-time Olympian skier Brian Stemmle, also a CBC analyst, denounced the maneouvre, rightly asking: “Why is the Stanley Cup at Canada House in Sochi? Other athletes don’t bring their trophies. Hate when hockey tries to overshadow other sports.”

A new diversion began. Continue reading

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