Tag Archives: Bruce Arthur

NFL: Goodell’s words are hollow and meaningless

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell held court with the media for 45 minutes at the Super Bowl on Friday. Much of what he said about player safety and concussions rang hollow. Which really isn't a surprise.No sport outside boxing is as dangerous as the one Goodell oversees as NFL commissioner. But he can continue to say things that are the opposite of true, and never more than about the things that truly matter.

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US Super Bowl: Concussions swept under the carpet

This week, says one player who worries about the ramifications of his career decision, ‘is all about football.’ Reported concussions rose 58 per cent in the NFL this season, though reported is very different from actual.

Broncos receiver Emmanuel Sanders, left, is focused on Super Bowl 50, and not the possible effects of concussions. "If I’m going to die, at least I’m going to die doing stuff that I love to do," he says. "And this is what I love to do.”

Broncos receiver Emmanuel Sanders, left, is focused on Super Bowl 50, and not the possible effects of concussions. “If I’m going to die, at least I’m going to die doing stuff that I love to do,” he says. “And this is what I love to do.” | MARK REIS / TNS

SANTA CLARA, CALIF.—One night Ryan Harris went to the movies with his wife. Harris is an eighth-year offensive lineman for the Denver Broncos, and started all 16 games this season. Going out was a nice way to unwind, until it wasn’t.

“My wife started crying,” says the six-foot-five, 302-pound Harris. “We were in another movie and they showed the preview for Concussion, and my wife started crying. I was like, we don’t need to see this movie.” Continue reading

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Deflategate: Report confirms organized cheating by NFL’s New England Patriots

New England quarterback Tom Brady, it seems, probably had knowldge of footballs being deflated. Maybe.

Quarterback Tom Brady, it seems, probably had knowledge of footballs being deflated. Maybe. | MADDIE MEYER / GETTY IMAGES

Where cheating is an organized system: “If employees of the Patriots could pull off cheating for over a year, get caught in obvious lies, leave text message evidence, impede NFL investigators, and come out of it with a report that cannot definitively say they cheated, then it raises some questions. First: Why wouldn’t you cheat, any way you could? Second: Who else is cheating, with their doofuses, trying to gain an angle in this merciless league? Third: Imagine if the NFL spent this much time and effort investigating how it handles concussions, and tried for the truth.” And, fourth, what if the criminal justice system was investigating this sports cartel, as the alleged offence in the “deflategate” is, in fact, a criminal offence under law, e.g., fraud, rather than an in-house, private investigation?

By BRUCE ARTHUR in the Toronto Star

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Investigative book, League of Denial, sheds appropriate light on NFL’s concussion-filled past

A sports cartel exposed: “A great conspiracy of money and power.” A recent study of retired players suggested that NFL retirees ages 60 to 89 are experiencing moderate to severe dementia at several times the national rate. “The NFL didn’t just suppress science, or ignore it; it disfigured it …. It is capitalism in its purest form, venal and powerful.”

This year, before the NFL settled with ex-players for US$765-million, commissioner Roger Goodell went on Face the Nation and again refused to admit any link between football and concussions | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

This year, before the NFL settled with ex-players for US$765-million, commissioner Roger Goodell went on Face the Nation and again refused to admit any link between football and concussions | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

National Post (Oct. 9) – IT’S HARD to pick out the most essential part of League of Denial, the book written by brothers Steve Fairanu and Mark Fairanu-Wada, or the most vivid scene: agent Leigh Steinberg talking to Troy Aikman after the 1994 NFC championship game in a darkened room, with Aikman’s brain skipping like a record; Hall of Famer and Pittsburgh Steeler Mike Webster using shock batons to get to sleep; the NFL’s enduring hostility to the idea that football could be linked to brain damage; the doctors whose research says it is. Continue reading

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