Tag Archives: Globalization of sport

Who is singing now?

By TONY SEED

(July 11, revised July 19) – The world has been saved from an England-France Brexit final at the 2018 World Cup, renditions of “Three Lions” and “Rule Britannia” in the stadiums, and the tsunami of British chauvinism unashamedly embraced by the Canadian media.

What goes around, comes around. The dodgy English threw their final match in the opening round with Belgium back on June 28 with the pretext of resting players and avoiding injuries for the Round of 16. “Sometimes, you have to make decisions with the bigger picture, and that’s what I did tonight,” rationalized head coach Gareth Southgate at the time – as if the decision was his and his alone. That “bigger picture” seems to have included getting a better draw in the knockout stage, that is, to avoid Brazil and therein build the size of the betting pool, the TV market, the revenues of the English Football Association, and a “hearts and minds” diversion from the Brexit crisis at home – giving a new definition to match fixing and a level playing field. Such are the elastic ethics of England.  Continue reading

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Soccer / Football

The sports industry, a gulf separates two worlds

(July 9) – Lightweight footwear under one hundred grams; swimsuits designed by experts in hydrodynamics that “cut” through the water with maximum efficiency; sensors placed in different accessories that calculate heart rate and provide other real time information; rackets that reduce vibration transfer resulting from the impact of the ball…  Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under History, Uncategorized

A World Cup without immigrants? Here’s what the teams would look like without them

Denmark

Denmark’s team, including the Ugandan-born Pione Sisto, poses before a friendly match with Sweden. Stockholm, Sweden. June 2, 2018. | Reuters

(teleSur) – Football is played everywhere by everyone.

People migrate for different reasons. Some leave their country of origin due to economic conditions, others flee violence, and some get contracts with football clubs. Finding a European team without immigrants is difficult and these players, often some of the world’s best, often leave their countries of origin at an early age in the hope of securing better opportunities, which tell us something about how the world actually works. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Soccer / Football

How English football is selling out its fans

In a country with food banks and hospital closures, it’s getting harder to tolerate football’s excesses | MARK TURLEY

Born from the sweat of the industrial working class, among its many nicknames association football has long been known as ‘the people’s game’. The phrase conjures up quaint images; jumpers for goalposts, local pride and vast stands full of flat caps. Since the Victorians codified it, our national love of the sport has become perhaps our most binding cultural myth. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Soccer / Football

Manchester City’s plan for global domination

Football has already been transformed by big money – but the capitalists behind Man City are trying to build a global corporation that will change the game for ever | GILES TREMLETT in The Guardian 

(December 15) – On 19 December 2009, Pep Guardiola stood and wept in the middle of Zayed Sports City Stadium in Abu Dhabi. The 38-year-old Barcelona manager clasped a hand across his face as his body gave way to huge, shoulder-heaving sobs. Zlatan Ibrahimović, the club’s towering Swedish striker, wrapped a tattooed arm around Guardiola’s neck and then gave him a vigorous push in order to jolt him out of it. But Guardiola could not stop. Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Soccer / Football

On Man U’s record revenues

© Clint Hughes

© Clint Hughes / AFP

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Soccer / Football

Sochi 2014: The NHL’s blatant provocation against the Olympics

This article, first published on February 21, 2014 during the Sochi Winter Olympics, exposes both the aim and the method of how the NHL, hand in hand with the sports media, began creating the conditions to justify launching its own private “World Cup of Hockey.”

The discourse runs like this: we poor owners have been victimized and our fans short-changed and held hostage by the Olympics, because “the best league in the world has been shut down” (Prime Time Sports, Rogers Sportsnet, February 18, 2014). “Just look at our empty buildings.” It is reminiscent of the old saw about the thief crying “stop thief!” | TONY SEED*

The NHL can only drool over the figures. The Canada-U.S. men's hockey semifinal drew a television audience of more than 15 million for CBC on Friday. Photo: Corey Perry of Canada tries a wraparound on Jonathan Quick of the USA as he is defended by Cam Fowler during first period action in the men's hockey semifinal at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games, February 21, 2014 | Jean Levac/Postmedia News

The NHL can only drool over the figures. The Canada-U.S. men’s hockey semifinal drew a television audience of more than 15 million for CBC. (Photo) Corey Perry of Canada tries a wraparound on Jonathan Quick of the USA as he is defended by Cam Fowler during first period action in the men’s hockey semifinal at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games, February 21, 2014 | Jean Levac/Postmedia News

SEEMINGLY out of the blue, the National Hockey League (NHL) based in New York sent their fabled Stanley Cup trophy to Sochi. The media slavered when it made its appearance at Canada House on Monday, February 17th. The iconic silver trophy had seemingly fallen from the sky or appeared as if a gift from the gods of sport with a spiritual significance comparable to a burning bush.

In the media euphoria, Canadian Olympic members were organized to pose with the trophy and world champion figure skater Patrick Chan to bless it with a kiss.

Four-time Olympian skier Brian Stemmle, also a CBC analyst, denounced the maneouvre, rightly asking: “Why is the Stanley Cup at Canada House in Sochi? Other athletes don’t bring their trophies. Hate when hockey tries to overshadow other sports.”

A new diversion began. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Athletes, Olympics - Sochi