Tag Archives: Militarization of Sport

Super Bowl 50: NFL’s promotion of ‘love’ for soldiers, weaponry and war

The thoroughgoing militarization of professional sports is carried out through the collusion of the NFL, MLB and NHL cartels, paid for by the Pentagon.

An overall inside view of Raymond James Stadium November 11, 2013 in Tampa, Fla. before an NFL game between the Miami Dolphins and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The promotion was nationally televised on Monday Night Football. 50,000 cards were provided to fans by USAA, the official military appreciation sponsor of the NFL | David Drapkin/AP images for USAA)

An overall inside view of Raymond James Stadium November 11, 2013 in Tampa, Fla. before an NFL game between the Miami Dolphins and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The promotion was nationally televised on Monday Night Football. 50,000 cards were provided to fans by USAA, the official military appreciation sponsor of the NFL | David Drapkin/AP images for USAA

Super Bowl 50 – a “sporting event” held on February 7 in San Francisco featuring the Carolina Panthers, the Denver Broncos and the Pentagon. coated in military promotion and jingoism, from flypasts of military jets to ads for “Captain America” of Marvel comic book fame at $5 million for a 30 second spot. The event is an orchestrated assault on the social consciousness of the American people: the CBS broadcast was watched by an estimated 111.9 million USians; according to Neilson, 49 per cent of all households with a TV were tuned in. The thoroughgoing militarization of the US Superbowl is hardly exceptional.

Overall, from 2012 to 2015, 18 NFL teams received more than $5.6 million from the military. Fifty teams across the five major professional leagues had contracts with the military, including ten MLB teams that took nearly $900,000, and eight teams each from the NBA and MLS that had similar contracts. Six NHL teams received money, and the Air Force paid more than $1.5 million to NASCAR. – TS

DAVID SWANSON* (Photos and captions added by TS)

(February 6) – Super Bowl 50 will be the first National Football League championship to happen since it was reported that much of the pro-military hoopla at football games, the honouring of troops and glorifying of wars that most people had assumed was voluntary or part of a marketing scheme for the NFL, has actually been a money-making scheme for the NFL. The U.S. military has been dumping millions of dollars, part of a recruitment and advertising budget that’s in the billions, into paying the NFL to publicly display love for soldiers and weaponry. Continue reading

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Systematic militarization by US sports monopolies and Pentagon

“Paid Patriotism”: a US report reveals massive pro-war and security propaganda campaign, which parallels that underway in Canada. Two pro-war politicians who are opposed, not to pro-war propaganda displays, but only to the fact that sports monopolies received payment for allowing the US state to put on its show. ERIC LONDON

Thunderbirds perform the MLB All-Star Game flyover

(November 6 ) – Anyone who has attended a professional sporting event in the United States over the last fifteen years is accustomed to the uncomfortable ritual of militarism that precedes each first pitch, kickoff or puck drop. Continue reading

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Pentagon paid US sports franchises to broadcast military propaganda

Excerpt from an article by MAC SLAVO*

How far will the US establishment go to prop up support for its many wars and make average Americans believe they are overseas fighting for ‘freedom’?

Apparently, flag waving, crowd saluting, veteran tributes and declarations of support for the troops and other nods to the military/guard that take place at the average professional sports game during half time  weren’t spontaneous displays of patriotism.

Instead, they were stage-managed military PR events that came with a price tag for taxpayers. Continue reading

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US Super Bowl: Militarization

The militarization of corporate sport and its spectacles such as the NFL Super Bowl is justified by the “war on terrorism” Yet, according to the U.S. military’s own super_bowl_xlviii_event assessment “no credible terrorist threats to Super Bowl XLV or its associated events and venues,” as revealed by WILLIAM M. ARKIN in 2012.

) – Janet “The American Commandant” Napolitano, the Secretary of Homeland Security, must be a hell of a football fan. She’s employing the full might of the Department’s “If You See Something, Say Something” ™ public awareness campaign to secure Super Bowl XLVI. Napolitano has toured the security operations at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, overseeing the additional security being brought in to screen cargo, secure the air space and provide security screening.

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U.S Air Force war games over Irish air space, disrupts major sport event

Two F-16s flying over peaceful Dublin on a quiet Saturday afternoon

Two F-16s flying over peaceful Dublin on a quiet Saturday afternoon

Croke Park is the central stadium of the GAA (Gaelic Athletic Association / Cumann Lúthchleas Gael), which is Ireland’s largest sporting organisation and celebrated as one of the great amateur sporting associations in the world today.

The event which was grossly disturbed by the US Air Force was the football match between Penn State v/s UCF played on the 30th of August. Continue reading

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US sporting events turned into mass religious events to bless wars and militarism

The religious reverie – repeated in sports arenas – is used to justify a bloated war budget and endless wars. CHRIS HEDGES

Memorial Day festivities before the Red Sox game against the Chicago White Sox at Fenway Park on May 30, 2011 in Boston, Massachusetts |  Joyce Vincent / Shutterstock.com

Memorial Day festivities before the Red Sox game against the Chicago White Sox at Fenway Park on May 30, 2011 in Boston, Massachusetts | Joyce Vincent / Shutterstock.com

BOSTON (July 8) — On Saturday I went to one of the massive temples across the country where we celebrate our state religion. The temple I visited was Boston’s Fenway Park. I was inspired to go by reading Andrew Bacevich’s thoughtful book “Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country,” which opens with a scene at Fenway from July 4, 2011. The Fourth of July worship service that I attended last week – a game between the Red Sox and the Baltimore Orioles – was a day late because of a rescheduling caused by Tropical Storm Arthur. When the crowd sang “The Star-Spangled Banner” a gargantuan American flag descended to cover “the Green Monster,” the 37-foot, 2-inch-high wall in left field. Patriotic music blasted from loudspeakers. Col. Lester A. Weilacher, commander of the 66th Air Base Group at Massachusetts’ Hanscom Air Force Base, wearing a light blue short-sleeved Air Force shirt and dark blue pants, threw the ceremonial first pitch. A line of Air Force personnel stood along the left field wall. The fighter jets—our angels of death—that usually roar over the stadium on the Fourth were absent. But the face of Fernard Frechette, a 93-year-old World War II veteran who was attending, appeared on the 38-by-100-foot Jumbotron above the center-field seats as part of Fenway’s “Hats Off to Heroes” program, which honors military veterans or active-duty members at every game. The crowd stood and applauded. Army National Guard Sgt. Ben Arnold had been honored at the previous game, on Wednesday. Arnold said his favorite Red Sox player was Mike Napoli. Arnold, who fought in Afghanistan, makes about $27,000 a year. Napoli makes $16 million. The owners of the Red Sox clear about $60 million annually. God bless America. Continue reading

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Militarism and sports

Raptors Camo

Peter Miller and Daniel Lyder

An oft-repeated opinion in the sports media is that sports and politics should absolutely never mix. If an athlete chooses to use his or her spotlight to voice or display a social or political opinion sports journalists, sports owners, and sports executives will often voice their disapproval.

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