Tag Archives: National Hockey League (NHL)

Russ Conway, 70, dies; His reporting led to a hockey boss’s downfall

While the Canadian sports media was mute, a US journalist detailed the corrupt acts of Alan Eagleson, the head of the NHL players’ union – a former Tory Party president – laying the groundwork for successful prosecutions in the United States and Canada. One of the most important conclusions, although not dealt with in this article by RICHARD SANDOMIR of The New York Times, is how easily the media back then was fooled by so many spinmeisters like Eagleson. As today, there was no shortage of journalists reporting that everything was hunky-dory in the NHL. 

The sportswriter Russ Conway in 1999 after learning that he would be receiving the Hockey Hall of Fame’s Elmer Ferguson Memorial Award for his reporting on the head of the N.H.L. players’ union | Carl Russo

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The Calgary stadium swindle (II)

Exactly how bad is the new Calgary Flames arena deal? Neil deMause writes in the Field of Schemes website:

(July 26) – With all of four days of public comment period (expiring today at noon, July 26) allowed before the Calgary city council votes next week on its Flames arena plan, the media have been commenting like crazy on how it’s either terrific or godawful. Among the takes:

  • Toronto Star columnist  says it’s “a pleasant surprise that somebody had actually decided to do something in this gloomy town,” and that despite the fact that the city will get little in the way of ticket taxes and naming-rights money, and Flames owner Murray Edwards could get a huge gift in the form of development rights to public land, it’s a good “compromise” because Calgary “badly needed a win on something, anything, after the debacle that was the bid for the 2026 Winter Olympics.” (Ed. note: The “debacle” was that the Olympics bid didn’t happen because Calgary voters didn’t like it.)
  • Edmonton Journal columnist David Staples says the new deal “appears to be far more favourable to the Flames owners than the arena proposal that broke down in 2017 and also more favourable than the deal Oilers owner Daryl Katz got in Edmonton”: He says Edmonton paid 47% of the Oilers’ arena cost, Calgary would pay 50% of the Flames’, up from 33% in the proposal from two years ago. But he admits that the “details are murky,” and ends up noting that even pro-arena Edmonton officials say it ended up being good to have a lengthy public debate on that city’s plan, though of course their side still won in the end, so they would say that.
  • Calgary Herald columnist Don Braid says that the new arena is good because Taylor Swift and Paul McCartney will be more likely to play there.
  • Macleans writer Jason Markusoff writes that the Flames owners “sweetened the pot” by agreeing to pay a ticket tax, but mostly city officials wanted something they could “claim victory” on: “Nenshi and the council want to remember what victory tastes like and get the public excited about something, even at the risk of getting the public furious anew. After Monday’s presentation, Nenshi gathered King and other principal players in the talks for a handshake photo op, until an aide rushed over and reminded the mayor of the optics of shaking hands on a deal that was just opened to public feedback. Oopsie.
  • Small business owners are mostly mad because the local economy sucks and they’d rather see their own business taxes reduced.
  • Global News contributed a not-very-helpful listicle of costs of recent NHL arenas that didn’t include any details of how much the public paid for each, because that shit is too complicated for a listicle, man, do you know how many posts we have to write today?

So who’s right? (more)

 

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The latest Calgary stadium swindle

After a closed meeting behind the backs of the people on July 22, the Calgary city council announced an outrageous pay-the-rich deal with the owners of the Calgary Flames of the NHL for a new 19,000-seat arena. It will be built on current Calgary Stampede parking lots to replace the Saddledome. Details include: Continue reading

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We need to talk about concussions, right now

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The darkness

College Hockey: ECAC Hockey Tournament: Dartmouth Adam Estoclet (23) in action vs Colgate during 3rd Place Game at Boardwalk Hall.Atlantic City, NJ 3/19/2011CREDIT: Lou Capozzola (Photo by Lou Capozzola /Sports Illustrated/Getty Images)(Set Number: X85650 TK1 R6 F19 )

2 March 2016 (playerstribune.com) – It was my first Christmas at home in 10 years. My family always has a big party with all our relatives — aunts, uncles, friends, turkey, beer, stories, laughter.

I can hear people start coming in the door upstairs, asking, “Where’s Adam?” The sound of their footsteps is like thunder. It’s breaking my brain. I’m supposed to be the big-shot pro hockey player, telling crazy stories about my adventures playing in Europe.

Instead, I’m hiding in the basement.  Continue reading

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Rick Nash forced to retire from hockey due to concussion issues

In this Feb. 25, 2018, file photo, Boston Bruins forward Rick Nash skates prior to a game against the Buffalo Sabres, in Buffalo, N.Y. | JEFFREY T. BARNES/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rick Nash has announced his retirement from hockey after suffering a concussion last March.

Top Shelf Hockey, which represents the 34-year-old winger from Brampton, Ont., put out a statement to announce his decision on Friday. Continue reading

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Are sports organizations playing a role in America’s obesity problem?

Sports Sponsorsby 

Last September, the National Football League struck a deal with Frito-Lay that allowed the company to produce limited-edition bags of Tostitos tortilla chips, with each package bearing the logo of one of 19 featured NFL teams. Several months earlier, Major League Baseball announced that Nathan’s Famous would be its first-ever official hot dog. Now the first-ever comprehensive analysis of such food and beverage sponsorships by major sports organizations shows just how pervasive these deals are. The confusing messages they send about physical fitness and healthy eating habits can’t be helping our national problem with obesity [1]. Continue reading

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