Tag Archives: Rogers Communications Inc.

Canadian women’s national team: the myth of small town hockey

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Is this small town hockey? | discountwallcovering.com

By PRETT PARDY*

A Maclean’s Magazine article by Aaron Hutchins asks “What can our big cities learn from Ste. Anne, Man.?” in regards to producing “a women’s hockey juggernaut, brought to you by small cities and towns.”  Of the 23 players on the national women’s team, none of them hail from any Canada’s five largest cities, which together account for 21 per cent of the Canadian population. Instead, 17 are from hometowns of less than 250,000 people. The article is an ode to the virtues of smaller communities for athlete development, focusing on increased ice time, less structured play on outdoor rinks, and even being safer. While there is some truth to these arguments (but not the safety one, the opposite is actually true; though nowhere in Canada is as dangerous as people often imagine), this romanticization is quite misleading. Continue reading

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NBA: ‘Canada’s team’ ‘disrespects’ ‘WE THE NORTH’

Jos 9:21 And the princes said concerning them: 'Let them live'; so they became hewers of wood and drawers of water unto all the congregation, as the princes had spoken concerning them.

Jos 9:21 And the princes said concerning them: ‘Let them live’; so they became hewers of wood and drawers of water unto all the congregation, as the princes had spoken concerning them.

(April 18) – The start time of a professional basketball game has brought to the fore the national question in Canadian sport.

“One of the competing media conglomerates that owns part of the Toronto Raptors is at least complicit in the team being stuck with an unenviable starting time for Game 1 of its playoff series,” Doug Smith reported in the Toronto Star.

“(Rogers) Sportsnet, which is a part-owner of Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment, will broadcast Game 1 against the Indiana Pacers at 12:30 p.m. Saturday on its two main networks. Continue reading

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Pan Am Games 2015: Toronto and Havana sporting links

The two cities share a rich and legendary baseball history but since 1959 have traversed radically different paths in the concept and practice of sport

By TONY SEED*

The 2015 Pan Am Games, being hosted by Toronto and with the celebration of friendship amongst the peoples of the Americas and the Caribbean as one of its positive themes, evokes a memory of the sporting links between the cities of Toronto and Havana, which date back to 1954.

During most of the 1950s the Havana Sugar Kings and the Toronto Maple Leafs were two of the flagship franchises in baseball’s International League, classified as AAA, a rung below US Major League Baseball (MLB). Continue reading

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Dome to nowhere (I)

TORONTO’S SKYDOME is the mother of “public-private partnerships” (P3) championed by neo-liberals as the template for economic development. It siphoned off hundreds of millions of dollars in public money to benefit private sports teams, the coffers of the construction monopolies and the finance capitalists who own Ontario’s debt. Whether the SkyDome ultimately came in “on budget” or not was irrelevant to the monopolies that were guaranteed their profits. As author/journalist Neil deMause reveals in his indepth exposé, when the budget was exceeded, in 1991 the financial oligarchy quickly swooped in to lend yet more money guaranteed by the state. The SkyDome reflects a medieval character of spending for the pleasure of a tiny aristocratic elite leaving the people to be spectators of the narcosis of American professional sport and consumers of a giant circus in which they participate only in a marginalized way. – Tony Seed Continue reading

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Dome to nowhere (III) – a timeline

1969-75: Various proposals are floated to build a publicly financed domed stadium to attract a major-league baseball team to Toronto; all meet significant public opposition, and none are seriously pursued.

1975: City spends $18 million to renovate then-26-year-old Exhibition Stadium. April 1977: The Blue Jays begin play at the Ex. Continue reading

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