Tag Archives: Science & Technology

Those Superfast Nike shoes are creating a problem

The people who oversee track and field have to give serious thought to how much running-shoe technology is too much |

Wearing a controversial Nike shoe, Eliud Kipchoge, the marathon world-record holder, broke the event’s two-hour barrier last weekend | Leonhard Foeger/Reuters

(October 18) – Last weekend’s extraordinary marathon performances — 1 hour 59 minutes 40 seconds by Eliud Kipchoge in Vienna and 2:14:04 by Brigid Kosgei in Chicago — have focused attention on an already simmering question: Does the International Association of Athletics Federations need a more stringent rule to define legal running shoes?

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Athletes, Athletics

Eliud Kipchoge makes history by running sub two-hour marathon

  • Kenyan runs unofficial time of 1hr 59min 40sec in Vienna
  • World record holder was assisted by 41 pacemakers and lasers

3 Comments

Filed under Athletes, Athletics

Cycling embraces risk, reward and the super tuck

The super tuck in 2017. It adds risk. But does it really save time?

The super tuck in 2017. It adds risk. But does it really save time? | Lionel Bonaventure/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

By 

ARREAU, France (July 23) — In this tiny commune in the Pyrenees, granite massifs and blue-green forests rise sheer, and we stand, myself and a crowd of several hundred, munching baguettes and sipping wine. We hear a great shout and then glance up the steep road to our east, where hurtling around the corner is …

… an aquamarine-clad human projectile. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Athletes

Tour de France: Audacious breakaways or power meters?

The pack rides during the tenth stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 217 kilometres (135 miles) with start in Saint-Flour and finish in Albi, France, Monday, July 15, 2019 | AP / Christophe Ena

BY SAMUEL PETREQUIN, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALBI, France (July 16)  — With all the technology stacked against them, the six breakaway riders at the Tour de France had no hope of making it to the finish without being caught.

Race directors were watching their every move on TV screens set up in their cars, and rival competitors riding behind were informed in instant time of the gap through earpieces. It was a day for a bunch sprint, and it could not be any different. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Athletes

Under the knife: Exposing the US’s youth basketball crisis

Basketball Canada, Raptors TV and the sports media promote the US as the “Go to” country for Canadian youth to develop their skills and make it as professionals. All six Canadians in the recent 2019 NBA draft, a record, went to US private basketball schools – in high school. Yet this occurs when the frenzied regimen of the US program is causing untold damage to American youth; players too often exhausted by marathon schedules, without proper training and with promising careers cut short because of it | Part II of a two-part series by BAXTER HOLMES, EPSN Senior Writer

(July 12) – A 3-YEAR-OLD BALL of energy named Noah bounds around a former live music venue one block from the beach in Santa Barbara. He’s surrounded by about a dozen top prep prospects from around the U.S., all here at P3 Applied Sports Science, a performance lab that has assessed the biomechanics of hundreds of the world’s best athletes, including about 350 NBA players over the past 11 years. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Athletes, Basketball

‘These kids are ticking time bombs’: The threat of youth basketball US-style

Basketball Canada, Raptors TV and the sports media promote the US as the “Go to” country for Canadian youth to develop their skills and make it as professionals. All six Canadians in the recent 2019 NBA draft, a record, went to US private basketball schools – in high school. Yet this occurs when the frenzied regimen of the US program is causing untold damage to American youth; players too often exhausted by marathon schedules, without proper training and with promising careers cut short because of it | Part I of a two-part series by BAXTER HOLMES, EPSN Senior Writer

(July 11) – STAPLES CENTER FALLS graveyard silent and still, a sellout crowd staring at the rookie beneath the basket, surrounded by medical personnel. His eyes are wet with tears. His head coach tells him to stay strong. It’s Oct. 28, 2014, the Lakers’ regular-season opener and the NBA debut for Julius Randle, a 6-foot-9 forward and the Lakers’ first first-round pick in seven years, a foundation of their post-Kobe Bryant future. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Athletes, Basketball

Modern facilities to strengthen Cuban sports

Leave a comment

Filed under Cuba